Quote

Hope everyone’s having a wonderful Sunday! Here’s your quote of the day…

20140330-103128.jpg

Laughter is wine for the soul – laughter soft, or loud and deep, tinged through with seriousness – the hilarious declaration made by man that life is worth living.

Seán O’Casey

When Irish playwright Seán O’Casey’s play The Plough and the Stars opened at the legendary Abbey Theatre in Dublin, audiences rioted. The controversy was good for business, and increased ticket sales allowed O’Casey (born March 30, 1880) to turn to writing full time.

Advertisements

Quote & Word of the Day!

A 2 in 1 today! A Quote that’s a Definition! Hope you enjoy it as much as I do. Happy Monday! 🙂

20130624-094020.jpg

Quote of the Day!

Love the world and yourself in it, move through it as though it offers no resistance, as though the world is your natural element.

Audrey Niffenegger

June 13, 1963: Happy birthday, Audrey Niffenegger! The author of The Time Traveler’s Wife famously received a $5 million advance for her second novel, Her Fearful Symmetry. She turns 50 today.

The Woman and the Fork

Woman and the Fork

There was a young woman who had been diagnosed with a terminal illness and had been given three months to live. So as she was getting her things ‘in order,’ she contacted her Pastor and had him come to her house to discuss certain aspects of her final wishes.

She told him which songs she wanted sung at the service, what scriptures she would like read, and what outfit she wanted to be buried in.

Everything was in order and the Pastor was preparing to leave when the young woman suddenly remembered something very important to her.

‘There’s one more thing,’ she said excitedly..

‘What’s that?’ came the Pastor’s reply?

‘This is very important,’ the young woman continued. ‘I want to be buried with a fork in my Right hand.’

The Pastor stood looking at the young woman, not knowing quite what to say.

That surprises you, doesn’t it?’ the young woman asked.

‘Well, to be honest, I’m puzzled by the request,’ said the Pastor.

The young woman explained. ‘My grandmother once told me this story, and from that time on I have always tried to pass along its message to those I love and those who are in need of encouragement. In all my years of attending socials and dinners, I always remember that when the dishes of the main course were being cleared, someone would inevitably lean over and say, ‘Keep your fork.’ It was my favorite part because I knew that something better was coming…like velvety chocolate cake or deep-dish apple pie. Something wonderful, and with substance!’

So, I just want people to see me there in that casket with a fork in my hand and I want them to wonder ‘What’s with the fork?’ Then I want you to tell them: ‘Keep your fork ..the best is yet to come.’

The Pastor’s eyes welled up with tears of joy as he hugged the young woman good-bye. He knew this would be one of the last times he would see her before her death. But he also knew that the young woman had a better grasp of heaven than he did. She had a better grasp of what heaven would be like than many people twice her age, with twice as much experience and knowledge. She KNEW that something better was coming.

At the funeral people were walking by the young woman’s casket and they saw the cloak she was wearing and the fork placed in her right hand. Over and over, the Pastor heard the question, ‘What’s with the fork?’ And over and over he smiled.

During his message, the Pastor told the people of the conversation he had with the young woman shortly before she died. He also told them about the fork and about what it symbolized to her. He told the people how he could not stop thinking about the fork and told them that they probably would not be able to stop thinking about it either.

He was right. So the next time you reach down for your fork let it remind you, ever so gently, that the best is yet to come. Friends are a very rare jewel, indeed.They make you smile and encourage you to succeed. Cherish the time you have, and the memories you share. Being friends with someone is not an opportunity, but a sweet responsibility.

Match Up Answers from yesterday!

20130609-181309.jpg

Match up Answers
Correct answers:

redoubt~sconce

putsch~coup d’etat

larynx~voice box

coppice~brushwood

panacea~cure-all

redoubt – A small, often temporary defensive fortification.
Synonyms: sconce
Usage: Great mounds had been heaped about the crest of the hill, making a huge redoubt of it.

putsch – A sudden attempt by a group to overthrow a government.
Synonyms: coup, coup d’etat, takeover
Usage: The people had been expecting a putsch for years, but they were surprised to wake up one morning and find themselves the subjects of a new government.

larynx – The part of the respiratory tract between the pharynx and the trachea, having walls of cartilage and muscle and containing the vocal cords enveloped in folds of mucous membrane.
Synonyms: voice box
Usage: By cunning operations on tongue, throat, larynx, and nasal cavities a man’s whole enunciation and manner of speech could be changed.

coppice – A thicket or grove of small trees or shrubs, especially one maintained by periodic cutting or pruning to encourage suckering, as in the cultivation of cinnamon trees for their bark.
Synonyms: thicket, brush, copse, brushwood
Usage: They determined on walking round Beechen Cliff, that noble hill whose beautiful verdure and hanging coppice render it so striking an object from almost every opening in Bath.

panacea – A remedy for all diseases, evils, or difficulties; a cure-all.
Synonyms: cure-all, nostrum
Usage: His panacea was somewhat in the nature of an anti-climax, but at least it had the merits of simplicity and of common sense.

Hope you had fun! Let me know if you’d like me to incorporate this game into the blog! Any comments and/or feedback is greatly appreciated!

All My Best,
1MorganLeFaye

Today’s Birthday

20130606-111803.jpg

William Thomas “W. T.” Cosgrave (Irish: Liam Tomás Mac Cosgair; 6 June 1880 – 16 November 1965), was an Irish politician who succeeded Michael Collins as Chairman of the Irish Provisional Government from August to December 1922. He served as the first President of the Executive Council (prime minister) of the Irish Free State from 1922 to 1932.[1]

William Thomas Cosgrave (1880)
Cosgrave was the first prime minister of the Irish Free State, which was created following a 1921 treaty with Britain. Serving from 1922 to 1932, he was able to maintain a democratic government despite several crises and the tensions related to the Irish struggle for sovereignty. Cosgrave was elected to British Parliament in 1918 but protested British rule by refusing to take his seat. Two years earlier, his role in the Easter Rising of 1916 earned him a death sentence. How did he avoid it?

Quote of the Day

20130506-132536.jpg

There ain’t no sin and there ain’t no virtue. There’s just stuff people do.

John Steinbeck

May 6, 1940: John Steinbeck received a Pulitzer Prize for his best-seller, The Grapes of Wrath, 73 years ago today. The title, based on a lyric from “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” was suggested by his wife.