Word of the Day for September 18th

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10 Over Used Eng­lish Words and What You Can Use Instead

Here’s a great list for overused words!

                                          

  •  Lit­tle- small, insuf­fi­cient, minute, tiny, mea­gre, slight, mini, petite, brief, lim­it­ed 💡
  • Pret­ty- attrac­tive, beau­ti­ful, cute, ele­gant, good-look­ing, love­ly, pleas­ant, hand­some (for a male)
  • Saw- glimpsed, spied, gazed, looked, watched, observed, glanced 🙄
  • Com­fort­able- appro­pri­ate, com­pla­cent, con­ve­nient, cozy, easy, loose, pleas­ant, relaxed, use­ful, snug
  • Nice- like­able, agree­able, love­ly, friend­ly, kind, thought­ful, decent 🙂
  • Inter­est­ing- engag­ing, exot­ic, fas­ci­nat­ing, impres­sive, intrigu­ing, stim­u­lat­ing, unusu­al, strik­ing, love­ly, com­pelling 😯

And More Overused Eng­lish Words

  • Good- fine, excel­lent, great, mar­velous, won­der­ful, sat­is­fy­ing, ter­rif­ic, delight­ful 😀
  • Said- told, respond­ed, stat­ed, remarked, com­ment­ed, replied, exclaimed, men­tioned
  • Awe­some- amaz­ing, alarm­ing, aston­ish­ing, awful, awe-inspir­ing, dread­ful, breath­tak­ing, impos­ing, impres­sive, mag­nif­i­cent, won­der­ful 😛
  • Like- love, pre­fer, appre­ci­ate, fan­cy, enjoy, favour, want, adore 😉

Word of the Day for July 5th

  • noun

1. the art of writing words with the proper letters, according to accepted usage; correct spelling. 

 2. the part of language study concerned with letters and spelling. 

 3. a method of spelling, as by the use of an alphabet or other system of symbols; spelling. 

 4. a system of such symbols: Missionaries provided the first orthography for the language. 

 5. an orthographic projection, or an elevation drawn by means of it. 

  • Quotes

… at bottom I disrespect our orthography most heartily, and as heartily disrespect everything that has been said by anybody in defence of it. Nothing professing to be a defence of our ludicrous spellings has had any basis, so far as my observation goes, except sentimentality.
– Mark Twain, “Chapters from My Autobiography,” North American Review, Volume CLXXXV, 1907

“Pardon me, sir. An urgent message just come on the despatch cart.” “‘Came,’ Constable.” The inspector examined the note. “Extraordinary. It seems, Constable Thackeray, that someone is asking me to release you from my class. I shall not refuse. Since the finer points of orthography have eluded you for so long, I am sure that they can wait another week.
– Peter Lovesey, Abracadaver, 1972

  • Origin

Orthography stems from the Greek word orthós meaning “straight, upright, correct.” It entered English in the early 1400s. 

Word of the Day for June 28th

  • adjective

 1. (of a usually complicated technical or computer process) done, operating, or happening in a way that is hidden from or not understood by the user, and in that sense, apparently “magical”: I just downloaded an automagical update to my word processing software that somehow fixed the problems. 

  • Quotes

According to Sterling, the result “is that I no longer inventory my possessions inside my own head. They’re inventoried through an automagical inventory voodoo, work done far beneath my notice by a host of machines. I no longer bother to remember where I put things.”
– Marcus Boon, In Praise of Copying, 2010

 

The scientific community calls this approach “automagical” … The manufacturer wants us to believe in–and trust–the magic. Even when things work well, it is somewhat discomforting to have no idea of how or why.
– Donald A. Norman, The Design of Future Things, 2007

  • Origin

Automagical entered Engish in the 1980s. Its first element, auto, stems from the Greek autómatos meaning “self-moving”; magical can be traced to the Greek magikós. 

Word of the day for Friday, 29th of January 

  

noun

 1. a highest point or state; culmination. 

 2. the point on the celestial sphere vertically above a given position or observer. 

Quotes

And at the zenith of his fame, how he would suddenly appear at the old village and stalk into church, brown and weather-beaten, in his black velvet doublet and trunks, his great jack-boots, his crimson sash, his belt bristling with horse pistols, his crime-rusted cutlass at his side, his slouch hat with waving plumes, his black flag unfurled, with the skull and crossbones on it, and hear with swelling ecstasy the whisperings, “It’s Tom Sawyer the Pirate!–the Black Avenger of the Spanish Main!”
– Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876

Hence it can hardly be wondered at that as his learning accumulated his practice dissolved, until at the very moment when he had attained the zenith of his celebrity he had also reached the nadir of his fortunes.
– Arthur Conan Doyle, The Mystery of Cloomber, 1889

Origin

Zenith comes from the Middle English cenith, which in turn traces back to the Old Spanish zenit. The lineage continues to the Arabic samt meaning “road” as in samt ar-rās, “road above one’s head.” 

Word of the day for 27th of January 

  

adjective

 1. inclined to quarrel or fight readily; quarrelsome; belligerent; combative. 

Quotes

Pugnacious people, if they did not actually terrify Oscar, were at least the sort of people he could not control, and whom he feared as possibly able to coerce him.
– George Bernard Shaw, “My Memories of Oscar Wilde,” Oscar Wilde: His Life and Confessions by Frank Harris, 1916

In addition, Rose, in retirement, had often resorted to the headfirst, pugnacious style he displayed as a player, not always seeming contrite about what he had done wrong.
– Michael S. Schmidt, “Dear Pete Rose: It’s Still a No. Sincerely, Baseball,” New York Times, December 14, 2015

Origin

Pugnacious stems from the Latin pugnāre meaning “to fight,” and shares ancestry with English word pugilism meaning “the art or practice of fighting with the fists; boxing.” Pugnacious entered English in the mid-1600s.