Today’s Trivia

Question: Which President is mentioned by name in the theme song of TV’s “All in the Family”?

Answer: On this day in 1971, the sitcom “All in the Family” premiered on CBS. The opening theme song “Those Were the Days”, was presented in a unique way for a 1970s series: Carroll O’Connor and Jean Stapleton seated at a piano and singing the tune on-camera at the start of every episode, concluding with live-audience applause. Herbert Hoover’s name is mentioned in the famous theme song to “All in the Family” with the lyrics…”Mister, we could use a man like Herbert Hoover again.” The show ranked number-one in the yearly Nielsen ratings from 1971 to 1976.

Advertisements

Today’s Trivia: Which founding father was killed as a result of wounds sustained in a duel?

Which founding father was killed as a result of wounds sustained in a duel?

Answer: Alexander Hamilton was shot and mortally wounded by Vice President Aaron Burr in one of the most famous duels in American history. The duel was the culmination of a long and bitter rivalry between the two men. Tensions reached a boiling point with Hamilton’s journalistic defamation of Burr’s character during the 1804 New York gubernatorial race. Ultimately, Burr challenged Hamilton to a duel. When both men drew their guns and shot, Hamilton was fatally wounded and brought back to New York City, where he died the next day.

Today in History, November 19th

11/19/2017

4 Score and 4 Trivia Questions about the Gettysburg Address

President Abraham Lincoln gave the Gettysburg Address on November 19th, 1863. It’s widely regarded as one of the famous speeches in history, but how much do you know about it? Try your hand at these four trivia questions about 272 words that proved a speech doesn’t have to be long to be memorable…

Who Wrote the Speech for Lincoln?

Rather than vilify the Confederacy after the battle of Gettysburg, Lincoln chose a more inclusionary tone for his speech. Photo credit: Greg Goebel/Flickr.

Today, whenever a president gives a speech, you know that it has been written by a professional speechwriter – someone who actually studied the art of public speaking and knows the mechanics of delivering a great speech. But in 1863, things were done a little differently. It was, in fact, Abraham Lincoln himself who wrote the Gettysburg Address – every word of it. He finished the speech the night before he gave it and spoke from the heart. That’s why it is still so powerful today.

Why Is This Speech So Famous?

Lincoln came out the night before his speech and told a few jokes to a crowd of several hundred people.

Lincoln could have made the speech all about defeating the South and winning the war, but he did not. Instead, he geared the speech toward keeping the country together, working together, healing rifts, and honoring the democratic intent of the country’s Founding Fathers. This was not a bitter speech, nor did it try to stir up anger or fear. It would have been very easy for Lincoln to go the emotional button-pressing route, but he took a more inclusionary path, reminding people that the war was not being fought to vanquish an enemy, but to hold together a country that was started with such promise.

What Was the Original Purpose of the Speech?

Lincoln’s speech was really supposed to be a short address that was more of an afterthought than anything else. The ceremony’s star guest was famed speaker Edward Everett, who spoke for two hours. Lincoln did plan out what he would say (the legend that he wrote it on the fly was just that, a legend), but his invitation was a last-minute decision, and he was supposed to be there more for moral support than anything else. Lincoln’s intent in the speech was to remind people of how important this war was to the country and to try to keep morale up after such a devastating battle. Instead, the short speech gradually gained a reputation for being one of the most eloquent examples of patriotism and devotion to the ideals of democracy.

What Newspaper Retracted the Poor Review it originally gave the Gettysburg Address 150 Years Later?

NPR did a tongue-in-cheek story about the paper’s retraction, including an interview with the Opinion Page editor.

At the time, newspapers made no bones about which side they supported. The Patriot-Union, a Pennsylvania newspaper, dismissed the president’s remarks as “silly” and wrote, “For the credit of the nation, we are willing that the veil of oblivion shall be dropped over them and that there shall be no more repeated or thought of.” At the 150 year anniversary of the Gettysburg Address, in 2013, the same newspaper, now known as the Patriot-News of Harrisburg, issued a retraction which read, “Seven score and ten years ago, the forefathers of this media institution brought forth to his audience a judgment so flawed, so tainted by hubris, so lacking in the perspective history would bring that it cannot remain unaddressed in our archives.”

Quote

Quote of the Day for Tuesday 

Body and soul, let’s all go / transformed into arrows! / Piercing the air / body and soul, let’s go / with no turning back. 


Ko Un

August 15, 1982: On this day, Ko Un was released from prison under a general amnesty. The former Buddhist monk, who had been given a life sentence for resisting the South Korean military dictatorship, went on to become one of the most acclaimed poets in Korea. 

Quote

Happy Saturday! Here’s July 29th’s Quote of the Day!

It is ‘where we are’ that should make all the difference, whether we believe we belong there or not. 


•Chang-rae Lee

After working on Wall Street for a year, Korean American novelist Chang-Rae Lee (born July 29, 1965) went back to school to get a masters degree in writing. Upon graduating, he turned his thesis into his first novel, the award-winning Native Speaker.

Quote

Love Of Words’ Quote of the Day for Tuesday 

Each day means a new twenty-four hours. Each day means everything’s possible again. You live in the moment, you die in the moment, you take it all one day at a time. 


Marie Lu

Happy birthday, Marie Lu! The young adult author of the Legend series has a “special love” for dystopian fiction, which may or may not have something to do with her being born in the year 1984.

10 Over Used Eng­lish Words and What You Can Use Instead

Here’s a great list for overused words!

                                          

  •  Lit­tle- small, insuf­fi­cient, minute, tiny, mea­gre, slight, mini, petite, brief, lim­it­ed 💡
  • Pret­ty- attrac­tive, beau­ti­ful, cute, ele­gant, good-look­ing, love­ly, pleas­ant, hand­some (for a male)
  • Saw- glimpsed, spied, gazed, looked, watched, observed, glanced 🙄
  • Com­fort­able- appro­pri­ate, com­pla­cent, con­ve­nient, cozy, easy, loose, pleas­ant, relaxed, use­ful, snug
  • Nice- like­able, agree­able, love­ly, friend­ly, kind, thought­ful, decent 🙂
  • Inter­est­ing- engag­ing, exot­ic, fas­ci­nat­ing, impres­sive, intrigu­ing, stim­u­lat­ing, unusu­al, strik­ing, love­ly, com­pelling 😯

And More Overused Eng­lish Words

  • Good- fine, excel­lent, great, mar­velous, won­der­ful, sat­is­fy­ing, ter­rif­ic, delight­ful 😀
  • Said- told, respond­ed, stat­ed, remarked, com­ment­ed, replied, exclaimed, men­tioned
  • Awe­some- amaz­ing, alarm­ing, aston­ish­ing, awful, awe-inspir­ing, dread­ful, breath­tak­ing, impos­ing, impres­sive, mag­nif­i­cent, won­der­ful 😛
  • Like- love, pre­fer, appre­ci­ate, fan­cy, enjoy, favour, want, adore 😉
Quote

Here’s Tuesday’s Quote of the Day!

I want to understand you, 

I study your obscure language. 


Alexander Pushkin

Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (born June 6, 1799) was part of the country’s literati from age 15. By 26, he had begun publishing the serialization of Eugene Onegin, his novel in verse. By 37, he was dead, killed in one of the 29 duels that he fought in his short life.

Quote

Thank Goodness it’s Friday! Here’s the Quote of the day…

MTE1ODA0OTcxNTQ2ODcxMzA5

 

What are men to rocks and mountains?

Jane Austen

 

April 1, 1816: The Prince Regent enjoyed Jane Austen’s novels, but he requested that she try her hand at a historical romance with less satirical and humorous elements. Austen was not amused. On this day, she wrote to the Prince Regent, “I could not sit down to write a serious romance under any other motive than to save my life.”

Yet another language crime to watch out for…

20131107-122214.jpg

Literally

The Internet is literally full of critics of the figurative use of literally. While employing this metaphorical usage might make many casual language lovers’ ears bleed, descriptivist lexicographers will hail you as a language innovator. My advice: be self-aware. Know that if you use literally figuratively, it will sound horrible to some, and perfectly acceptable to others.

There are still four more, but you’ll have to tune back in tomorrow for the rest! Why not subscribe via email? That way you’ll never miss an insightful post! 😉

Have a wonderful day everyone! 🙂

All my best,
Jill a.k.a. 1morganlefaye