Today in History ~October 9th

Today in History – October 9

October 9

On October 9, 1701, the colonial legislature of Connecticut chartered the Collegiate School in Saybrook to educate students for “Publick employment both in Church & Civil State.” Originally based at the house of the first rector in Killingworth, the school moved to New Haven in 1716, and in 1718 was renamed Yale College to honor its early benefactor, the merchant Elihu Yale.
Osborn Hall, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. [between 1900 and 1915]. Detroit Publishing Company. Prints & Photographs Division

Yale graduates were influential in the American Revolution. Lyman Hall, Philip Livingston, Lewis Morris, and Oliver Wolcott signed the Declaration of Independence. Twenty-five Yale men served in the Continental Congress and the patriots Nathan Hale and Noah Webster also were among its graduates.

Yale evolved into a university in the late 1700s to mid-1800s when its original liberal arts curriculum expanded to include graduate and professional education. Among Yale’s most prestigious schools are those of divinity, medicine, law, and art. The first doctoral degrees earned in the United States were awarded by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in 1861.
In 1832, the Yale University Art Gallery became the first American college art museum. Built with funds from the Connecticut legislature, the gallery housed a series of American Revolutionary War paintings donated by Colonel John Trumbull. Also associated with Yale are the Yale Center for British Art , the Peabody Museum of Natural History, and Yale University Press , one of the nation’s most distinguished university publishing houses.

Yale has had other notable nineteenth-century firsts. These include the first collegiate rowing races, held in 1843, and the first intercollegiate game of modern baseball in 1865. In 1861 Yale became the first U.S. university to award a PhD in philosophy. The Yale Daily News, the oldest college daily newspaper, was founded in 1878.

Notable Yale graduates include: presidents William Howard Taft, Gerald Ford, George H. W. Bush, and Bill Clinton; inventor Samuel F. B. Morse; Dr. Benjamin Spock, and statesman John C. Calhoun. In 1781, Yale University conferred the honorary degree of “Doctorate in Laws” on George Washington. Search on Yale in the collection George Washington Papers to view the correspondence of Ezra Stiles, president of the university, with George Washington.

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Quote of the Day for Tuesday 

Body and soul, let’s all go / transformed into arrows! / Piercing the air / body and soul, let’s go / with no turning back. 


Ko Un

August 15, 1982: On this day, Ko Un was released from prison under a general amnesty. The former Buddhist monk, who had been given a life sentence for resisting the South Korean military dictatorship, went on to become one of the most acclaimed poets in Korea. 

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Love Of Words’ Quote of the Day for Tuesday 

A poem begins as a lump in the throat, a sense of wrong, a homesickness, a lovesickness. 


•Robert Frost

August 1, 1915: Robert Frost’s The Road Not Taken was first published in the Atlantic Monthly 102 years ago today. While the poem works as a metaphor for the weight we put on turning points in our lives, Frost later insisted the verses were simply inspired by a literal walk in the woods.

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Love Of Words’ Quote of the Day for Sunday 

I have to see a thing a thousand times before I see it once. 


~Thomas Wolfe

July 9, 1937: On this day, F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote a letter to Thomas Wolfe, advising his fellow author to write shorter novels. Wolfe responded with a letter eight times as long as Fitzgerald’s.

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Happy Tuesday! Here’s your quote of the day…

  

Anyone in pursuit of art is responding to a desire to make visible that which is not, to offer the unknown self to others. 

Hettie Jones

October 13, 1958: On this day, Hettie Cohen married poet LeRoi Jones—and took his last name. She would write about that day (and others) in her memoir, How I Became Hettie Jones.

Fact of the Day•Today in History•Today’s Birthdays

Fact of the Day:

New Jersey is home to the world’s first drive-in movie theater.

Today in History:

January 24, 1965
Former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill died in London at age 90.

Today’s Birthdays:

January 24
1968 – Mary Lou Retton
1941 – Neil Diamond
(1949-1982) – John Belushi

All My Best,
Jill M Roberts

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Thank goodness it’s Thursday! Here’s your quote of the day…

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A party without cake is just a meeting 

Julia Child

October 16, 1961: Culinary life was forever changed with the publication of Julia Child, Simone Beck, and Louisette Bertholle’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking, 53 years ago today.

Quote of the day!

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The salvation of this human world lies nowhere else than in the human heart, in the human power to reflect, in human meekness and human responsibility.

Václav Havel

December 29, 1989: Czech playwright Vaclav Havel continued to be a champion of human rights and free speech even as he became the president of Czechoslovakia, 24 years ago today.