10 Over Used Eng­lish Words and What You Can Use Instead

Here’s a great list for overused words!

                                          

  •  Lit­tle- small, insuf­fi­cient, minute, tiny, mea­gre, slight, mini, petite, brief, lim­it­ed 💡
  • Pret­ty- attrac­tive, beau­ti­ful, cute, ele­gant, good-look­ing, love­ly, pleas­ant, hand­some (for a male)
  • Saw- glimpsed, spied, gazed, looked, watched, observed, glanced 🙄
  • Com­fort­able- appro­pri­ate, com­pla­cent, con­ve­nient, cozy, easy, loose, pleas­ant, relaxed, use­ful, snug
  • Nice- like­able, agree­able, love­ly, friend­ly, kind, thought­ful, decent 🙂
  • Inter­est­ing- engag­ing, exot­ic, fas­ci­nat­ing, impres­sive, intrigu­ing, stim­u­lat­ing, unusu­al, strik­ing, love­ly, com­pelling 😯

And More Overused Eng­lish Words

  • Good- fine, excel­lent, great, mar­velous, won­der­ful, sat­is­fy­ing, ter­rif­ic, delight­ful 😀
  • Said- told, respond­ed, stat­ed, remarked, com­ment­ed, replied, exclaimed, men­tioned
  • Awe­some- amaz­ing, alarm­ing, aston­ish­ing, awful, awe-inspir­ing, dread­ful, breath­tak­ing, impos­ing, impres­sive, mag­nif­i­cent, won­der­ful 😛
  • Like- love, pre­fer, appre­ci­ate, fan­cy, enjoy, favour, want, adore 😉

Word of the day for Tuesday!

redux • \ree-DUKS\  • adjective
: brought back 

Examples:
Now running in his own campaign, the son of the former mayor was advised to develop his own identity and not simply portray himself as his father redux

“Think of it as ‘Combat Evolved’ redux. ‘Destiny’ wants to meld the multiplayer and single-player experience into a coherent whole.” — Gieson Cacho, San Jose Mercury News, September 16, 2014

Did you know?
In Latin, redux (from the verb reducere, meaning “to lead back”) can mean “brought back” or “bringing back.” The Romans used redux as an epithet for the Goddess Fortuna with its “bringing back” meaning; Fortuna Redux was “one who brings another safely home.” But it was the “brought back” meaning that made its way into English. Redux belongs to a small class of English adjectives that are always used postpositively—that is, they always follow the words they modify. Redux has a history of showing up in titles of English works, such as John Dryden’s Astraea Redux (a poem “on the happy restoration and return of his sacred majesty, Charles the Second”), Anthony Trollope’s Phineas Redux, and John Updike’s Rabbit Redux.

Word of the day for Saturday, October 11th

derogate • \DAIR-uh-gayt\  • verb
1 : to cause to seem inferior : disparage 2 : to take away a part so as to impair : detract 3 : to act beneath one’s position or character 

Examples:
It is easy to derogate the prom committee for its lackluster theme now, but nobody came forward with any better ideas while it was being discussed. 

“In two national elections, American voters definitively entrusted that man with the job. That man represents the presidency…. Politicians who publicly disrespect the man who holds that office derogate their own profession.” — Laura Washington, Chicago Sun-Times, June 23, 2014

Did you know?
You’re probably familiar with derogatory, the adjective meaning “expressing a low opinion,” but you may not be as well-acquainted with the less common verb, derogate. Both words can be traced back to the Late Latin wordderogatus, which is the past participle of the verbderogare, meaning “to detract” or “to annul (a law).”Derogare, in turn, derives from the Latin word for “ask,”rogareDerogate first appeared in English in the 15th century. Derogatory was adopted in the early 16th century, and has become much more popular than the verb. Other derogate relatives include derogative,derogation, and derogatorily.

Word of the day for Friday, October 10th

clerisy • \KLAIR-uh-see\  • noun
: intellectuals who form an artistic, social, or political vanguard or elite: intelligentsia 

Examples:
The book’s author claims that a successful society must have both a strong commitment to democratic ideals and a well-established clerisy

“The situation was so dire that it required nothing less than scientific experts freed from constitutional strictures to run the government and the elevation of intellectuals and artists to the status of a new culturalclerisy.” — Daniel DiSalvo, The Washington Times, February 18, 2014

Did you know?
English philosopher-poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) believed that if humanity was to flourish, it was necessary to create a secular organization of learned individuals, “whether poets, or philosophers, or scholars” to “diffuse through the whole community … that quantity and quality of knowledge which was indispensable.” Coleridge named this hypothetical group the clerisy, a term he adapted from Klerisei, a German word for clergy(in preference, it seems, to the Russian term intelligentsiawhich we borrowed later, in the early 1900s). Coleridge may have equated clerisy with an old sense of clergymeaning “learning” or “knowledge,” which by his time was used only in the proverb “an ounce of mother wit is worth a pound of clergy.”