A Little Trivia for Today

Previously holding the position as Princeton University president, which president was nicknamed “Professor”?

Before entering politics, Woodrow Wilson spent many years as a college professor. He would become president of Princeton University and Governor of New Jersey before becoming elected the 28th President of the United States. Wilson led America through World War I and crafted the Versailles Treaty’s “Fourteen Points,” the last of which was creating a League of Nations, a precursor to the United Nations. An advocate for democracy and world peace, “The Professor” is often ranked by historians as one of the nation’s greatest presidents.

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Did you know…? This Day in History

Did You Know…Canned beer makes its debut on this day in 1935. In partnership with the American Can Company, the Gottfried Krueger Brewing Company delivered 2,000 cans of Krueger’s Finest Beer and Krueger’s Cream Ale to faithful Krueger drinkers in Richmond, Virginia. Canned beer was an immediate success. Ninety-one percent of the drinkers approved of the canned beer, driving Krueger to give the green light to further production. By the end of the year, 37 breweries follow the lead of the Gottfried Krueger Brewery.

Did you know…? Series of Highlights in Internet History

Highlights in Internet History

Did you know…Co-founded in 1994 by Jerry Yang and David Filo while they were PhD students at Stanford, the company that would become a leading search engine and pioneer of the internet used to go by a much lesser known name. The search engine giant began as Jerry’s Guide to the World Wide Web, but by 1995 the founders realized they’d need something a bit more concise, so they renamed the company Yahoo! — an acronym for “Yet Another Hierarchical Officious Oracle.” According to Filo, the exclamation point was added for “pure marketing hype.”

Today’s Trivia

Question: Which President is mentioned by name in the theme song of TV’s “All in the Family”?

Answer: On this day in 1971, the sitcom “All in the Family” premiered on CBS. The opening theme song “Those Were the Days”, was presented in a unique way for a 1970s series: Carroll O’Connor and Jean Stapleton seated at a piano and singing the tune on-camera at the start of every episode, concluding with live-audience applause. Herbert Hoover’s name is mentioned in the famous theme song to “All in the Family” with the lyrics…”Mister, we could use a man like Herbert Hoover again.” The show ranked number-one in the yearly Nielsen ratings from 1971 to 1976.

Today’s Trivia: Which founding father was killed as a result of wounds sustained in a duel?

Which founding father was killed as a result of wounds sustained in a duel?

Answer: Alexander Hamilton was shot and mortally wounded by Vice President Aaron Burr in one of the most famous duels in American history. The duel was the culmination of a long and bitter rivalry between the two men. Tensions reached a boiling point with Hamilton’s journalistic defamation of Burr’s character during the 1804 New York gubernatorial race. Ultimately, Burr challenged Hamilton to a duel. When both men drew their guns and shot, Hamilton was fatally wounded and brought back to New York City, where he died the next day.

Word of the day~ January 3rd – SoundCloud

Listen to Word of the day~ January 3rd by JillNYC76 #np on #SoundCloud  Here
Or read it now:

peremptory • \puh-REMP-tuh-ree\  • adjective
1 : barring a right of action, debate, or delay 2 : expressive of urgency or command 3 : marked by arrogant self-assurance : haughty 

Examples:
The manager’s peremptory rejection of any suggestions for improving office efficiency did little to inspire our confidence in his ability to help turn the company around. 

“Depending on the situation, Elliott can heap upon her teammates words of encouragement or, when it’s needed, she can also be peremptory.” — Chris Hummer,Midland (Texas) Reporter-Telegram, November 10, 2014

Did you know?
Peremptory is ultimately from Latin perimere, which means “to take entirely” or “destroy” and comes from per-(“thoroughly”) and emere (“to take”). Peremptory implies the removal of one’s option to disagree or contest something. It sometimes suggests an abrupt dictatorial manner combined with an unwillingness to tolerate disobedience or dissent (as in “he was given a peremptory dismissal”). A related term is the adjective preemptive, which comes from Latin praeemere—from prae- (“before”) plus emerePreemptive means “marked by the seizing of the initiative” (as in “a preemptive attack”).

All My Best,
Jill M Roberts

Word of the day – SoundCloud

Listen to Word of the day by JillNYC76 #np on #SoundCloud
réchauffé

Even though it’s yesterday’s word, I thought it was a good one! Just click on réchauffé above and the word of the day will play for you! Or, you can read it below:
réchauffé • \ray-shoh-FAY\  • noun
1 : something presented in a new form without change of substance : rehash 2 : a warmed-over dish of food 

Examples:
The day after the holiday, it was traditional to serveréchauffés and snacks rather than cook a full meal. 

“[It] is a réchauffé, … lifted and stitched from ‘The Gastronomical Me’ and other books.” — Victoria Glendinning, New York Times Book Review, June 9, 1991

Did you know?
We borrowed réchauffé in the early 19th century from the French; it is the past participle of their verb réchauffer, which means “to reheat.” Nineteenth-century French speakers were using it figuratively to designate something that was already old hat—you might say, “warmed over.” English speakers adopted that same meaning, which is still our most common. But within decades someone had apparently decided that leftovers would seem more appealing with a French name. The notion caught on. A recipe for “Réchauffé of Beef a la Jardiniere,” for example, instructs the cook to reheat “yesterday’s piece of meat” in a little water with some tomatoes added, and serve it on a platter with peas and carrots and potatoes. Réchauffé shares its root with another English word, chafing dish, the name of a receptacle for keeping food warm at the table.

Please let me know if you like the SoundCloud clip I was able to share it through or if you think the clip is unnecessary.
Thanks and Make it a great day! 🙂