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Quote of the Day for Tuesday 

Body and soul, let’s all go / transformed into arrows! / Piercing the air / body and soul, let’s go / with no turning back. 


Ko Un

August 15, 1982: On this day, Ko Un was released from prison under a general amnesty. The former Buddhist monk, who had been given a life sentence for resisting the South Korean military dictatorship, went on to become one of the most acclaimed poets in Korea. 

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Love Of Words’ Quote of the Day for Saturday!

Ultimately, your theme will find you. You don’t have to go looking for it. 


~Richard Russo

Happy birthday, Richard Russo! The Pulitzer Prize-winning author wrote his first novel, Mohawk, while working full-time as a college teacher. During breaks between classes, he’d go to a local diner and write.

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Love Of Words’ Quote of the Day for Sunday 

I have to see a thing a thousand times before I see it once. 


~Thomas Wolfe

July 9, 1937: On this day, F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote a letter to Thomas Wolfe, advising his fellow author to write shorter novels. Wolfe responded with a letter eight times as long as Fitzgerald’s.

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Happy Thursday! Here’s Your Quote of the Day…

And now here is my secret, a very simple secret: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye. 


Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

In the beloved French novella The Little Prince, a pilot who has crashed in the desert encounters a young prince visiting Earth from his home asteroid. The premise was inspired by author Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s (born June 29, 1900) own desert crash. After three days without water, he was saved by a passing Bedouin.

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Here’s Tuesday’s Quote of the Day!

I want to understand you, 

I study your obscure language. 


Alexander Pushkin

Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (born June 6, 1799) was part of the country’s literati from age 15. By 26, he had begun publishing the serialization of Eugene Onegin, his novel in verse. By 37, he was dead, killed in one of the 29 duels that he fought in his short life.

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Quote of the Day for November 10th!

It is my belief that books are living things…. And as living things, they need to be protected. 

Holly Black

Holly Black (born November 10, 1971) is a bestselling author of fantasy fiction for children and teens, including the Modern Faerie Tale series, the Curse Workers series, and the Spiderwick Chronicles (with Tony DiTerlizzi). In 2008, the Spiderwick Chronicles was adapted into a film.

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Quote of the Day for June 22nd!

Yea, all things live forever, though at times they sleep and are forgotten. 


H. Rider Haggard

Long before J.K. Rowling introduced readers to the villainous He-who-must-not-be-named, English writer H. Rider Haggard (born June 22, 1856) gave us She-who-must-be-obeyed, an ancient queen and sorceress, in his 1886 adventure novel, She.

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Thursday’s Quote of the Day!

Maybe who we are isn’t so much about what we do, but rather what we’re capable of when we least expect it. 


Jodi Picoult

Happy birthday, Jodi Picoult! Today she’s known for bestsellers including My Sister’s Keeper and Nineteen Minutes, but Picoult has been writing since the age of five. Her first attempt was a short story entitled The Lobster Which Misunderstood.

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Thank Goodness it’s Friday! Here’s the Quote of the day…

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What are men to rocks and mountains?

Jane Austen

 

April 1, 1816: The Prince Regent enjoyed Jane Austen’s novels, but he requested that she try her hand at a historical romance with less satirical and humorous elements. Austen was not amused. On this day, she wrote to the Prince Regent, “I could not sit down to write a serious romance under any other motive than to save my life.”

Hope you’re having a great Sunday! Here’s the Quote of the day…

  

It is the very mark of the spirit of rebellion to crave for happiness in this life 


Henrik Ibsen

March 13, 1891: On this day, Henrik Ibsen’s Ghosts opened in London. The play’s frank discussion of incest, religion, and euthanasia was not well-received at the time. King Oscar II of Sweden and Norway even found it necessary to tell the playwright that Ghosts was not a good play.