Word of the Day ~prevaricate

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Word of the Day for July 13th

  • noun

 1. the voice of the people; popular opinion. 

  • Quotes

Polls are certainly useful devices for plumbing the depths of the vox populi.
– James D. Williams, “Detroit News Poll Not Quite What It Seems,” The Crisis, June–July 1992

Because of the recent silencing of most European democracies, in the choice of Willkie that night there was, even to many cynical or Democratic ears, an exciting, stirring sound, as of vox populi.
– “From Life’s Correspondents: Flanner on Willkie,” Life, October 28, 1940

  • Origin

Vox populi is of Latin origin, and is often found in the maxim vox populi, vox Dei meaning “the voice of the people is the voice of God.” It entered English in the mid-1500s. 

Here is Saturday’s Word of the Day…

  

groggery 

  • noun

 1. a slightly disreputable barroom. 

Quotes

P. Dusenheimer, standing in the door of his uninviting groggery, when the trains stopped for water, never received from the traveling public any patronage except facetious remarks upon his personal appearance.
– Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner, The Gilded Age, 1873

A volleyball court seemed to occupy the confectioner’s shop, the confectioner was nearly on top of the bridal shop, and the bridal shop had insinuated itself into the groggery next door.
– Lawrence Millman, “The Bay Islands,” Islands, February, 1994

Origin

Groggery is an Americanism formed on the basis of the word grog meaning “a strong alcoholic drink.” It entered English in the early 1800s. 

Here’s the Word of the Day this New Year’s Eve 2015!

  

adjective

 1. glittering, especially with tinsel; decked with garish finery. 

noun

 1. imitation gold leaf; tinsel; false glitter. 

Quotes

Sharp perfumes stabbed the nostrils, clinquant finery flashed and glittered in a tinsel maelstrom…
– Arthur Cheney Train, The Needle’s Eye, 1924
Jubilation is the dominant mood when- and wherever a Christo/Jeanne-Claude project is realized. I have witnessed it time and again—32 years ago, in Loose Park, Kansas City, overlooking its Wrapped Walk Ways, every inch of the winding itinerary paved with bright clinquant stuff, of which Christo remarked: “When the sunlight falls on that nylon and sets it sparkling, it’s very beautiful.”
– Leo Steinberg, “Christo’s ‘Over the River’: An Act of Homage,” New York Review of Books, December 3, 2010

Origin

Clinquant entered English in the late 1500s and ultimately derives from the Dutch klinken meaning “to sound.” 

Today’s word of the day…

  

noun

 1. air, bearing, or demeanor, as showing character, feeling, etc.: a man of noble mien. 

Quotes

She is lovely, the hair, makeup and costumes are excellent, but the actress works so hard to recreate the movie star’s voice, mien and magic that the distance is only magnified.
– Alessandra Stanley, “Review: ‘Grace of Monaco,’ a Fractured Fairy Tale on Lifetime,” New York Times, May 24, 2015

His manners in private were even more mild and attractive than in public; for there was a certain dignity in his mien during his lecture which in his own house was replaced by the greatest affability and kindness.
– Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; or The Modern Prometheus, 1818

Origin
Mien is most likely a shortening of the word demean meaning “to conduct oneself in a specified manner.” It entered English in the 1500s. 

Make it a Great Day!!! 😊