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Quote of the Day for Tuesday 

Body and soul, let’s all go / transformed into arrows! / Piercing the air / body and soul, let’s go / with no turning back. 


Ko Un

August 15, 1982: On this day, Ko Un was released from prison under a general amnesty. The former Buddhist monk, who had been given a life sentence for resisting the South Korean military dictatorship, went on to become one of the most acclaimed poets in Korea. 

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Love Of Words’ Quote of the Day for Tuesday 

A poem begins as a lump in the throat, a sense of wrong, a homesickness, a lovesickness. 


•Robert Frost

August 1, 1915: Robert Frost’s The Road Not Taken was first published in the Atlantic Monthly 102 years ago today. While the poem works as a metaphor for the weight we put on turning points in our lives, Frost later insisted the verses were simply inspired by a literal walk in the woods.

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Happy Saturday! Here’s July 29th’s Quote of the Day!

It is ‘where we are’ that should make all the difference, whether we believe we belong there or not. 


•Chang-rae Lee

After working on Wall Street for a year, Korean American novelist Chang-Rae Lee (born July 29, 1965) went back to school to get a masters degree in writing. Upon graduating, he turned his thesis into his first novel, the award-winning Native Speaker.

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Love Of Words’ Quote of the Day for Sunday 

I have to see a thing a thousand times before I see it once. 


~Thomas Wolfe

July 9, 1937: On this day, F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote a letter to Thomas Wolfe, advising his fellow author to write shorter novels. Wolfe responded with a letter eight times as long as Fitzgerald’s.

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Here’s Tuesday’s Quote of the Day!

I want to understand you, 

I study your obscure language. 


Alexander Pushkin

Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (born June 6, 1799) was part of the country’s literati from age 15. By 26, he had begun publishing the serialization of Eugene Onegin, his novel in verse. By 37, he was dead, killed in one of the 29 duels that he fought in his short life.

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Happy Humpday! Here’s Wednesday’s Quote of the Day! ❤️

In secret we met 

In silence I grieve, 

That thy heart could forget, 

Thy spirit deceive. 


George Gordon Byron

May 17, 1824: Before dying in Greece, Lord Byron entrusted a friend with his memoirs. Other friends, worried that the memoirs would be scandalous, fought to destroy the manuscript—190 years ago today, they succeeded, tearing it up and burning it in the office of Byron’s publisher.

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Quote of the Day!

Do you believe in fairies?…If you believe, clap your hands!


•JM Barrie

Boys who wouldn’t grow up occupied the imagination of British writer J.M. Barrie (born May 9, 1860), making appearances in his work both before and after his iconic play, Peter Pan.

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Thank Goodness it’s Friday! Here’s Your Quote of the Day…

The village of Holcomb stands on the high wheat plains of western Kansas, a lonesome area that other Kansans call “out there. 


Truman Capote

Not long after midnight on April 14, 1965, the murderers depicted in Truman Capote’s true-crime book, In Cold Blood, were executed. The writer was in attendance.

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Hope You’re Having a Wonderful Sunday! Here’s Your Quote of the Day…

I go to seek a Great Perhaps. 


François Rabelais

French Renaissance man Francois Rabelais died 464 years ago today. His legacy includes the word Rabelaisian—used to describe good-natured, bawdy humor—and these brief last words that are in dispute but still worth remembering.

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TGIF! Here’s The Quote of the Day…

I think; therefore I am. 


~René Descartes

One of the first modern Western philosophers, René Descartes (born March 31, 1596) consciously sought to break with thinkers of the past. He was also an influential mathematician who developed Cartesian geometry and laid the path for calculus.