Word of the Day for July 5th

  • noun

1. the art of writing words with the proper letters, according to accepted usage; correct spelling. 

 2. the part of language study concerned with letters and spelling. 

 3. a method of spelling, as by the use of an alphabet or other system of symbols; spelling. 

 4. a system of such symbols: Missionaries provided the first orthography for the language. 

 5. an orthographic projection, or an elevation drawn by means of it. 

  • Quotes

… at bottom I disrespect our orthography most heartily, and as heartily disrespect everything that has been said by anybody in defence of it. Nothing professing to be a defence of our ludicrous spellings has had any basis, so far as my observation goes, except sentimentality.
– Mark Twain, “Chapters from My Autobiography,” North American Review, Volume CLXXXV, 1907

“Pardon me, sir. An urgent message just come on the despatch cart.” “‘Came,’ Constable.” The inspector examined the note. “Extraordinary. It seems, Constable Thackeray, that someone is asking me to release you from my class. I shall not refuse. Since the finer points of orthography have eluded you for so long, I am sure that they can wait another week.
– Peter Lovesey, Abracadaver, 1972

  • Origin

Orthography stems from the Greek word orthós meaning “straight, upright, correct.” It entered English in the early 1400s. 

Here is Saturday’s Word of the Day…

  

groggery 

  • noun

 1. a slightly disreputable barroom. 

Quotes

P. Dusenheimer, standing in the door of his uninviting groggery, when the trains stopped for water, never received from the traveling public any patronage except facetious remarks upon his personal appearance.
– Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner, The Gilded Age, 1873

A volleyball court seemed to occupy the confectioner’s shop, the confectioner was nearly on top of the bridal shop, and the bridal shop had insinuated itself into the groggery next door.
– Lawrence Millman, “The Bay Islands,” Islands, February, 1994

Origin

Groggery is an Americanism formed on the basis of the word grog meaning “a strong alcoholic drink.” It entered English in the early 1800s. 

Sorry it’s late, but here’s your quote of the day…

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Today a reader, tomorrow a leader.

Margaret Fuller

Journalist and women’s rights activist Margaret Fuller (born May 23, 1810) was the first woman to be allowed the use of Harvard’s Library. It was granted because she’d earned a reputation as the most well-read person in New England.

It’s the start of a new week! Hope you have a good Monday, here’s your quote of the day…

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Anyone can be a barbarian; it requires a terrible effort to remain a civilized man.

Leonard Woolf

November 25, 1880: Though he was an influential literary figure in his own right and part of the famed Bloomsbury group, Leonard Woolf is best known as Virginia Woolf’s husband. He was born in London, 133 years ago today.

Happy Sunday everyone! Here’s your quote of the day…

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Books should go where they will be most appreciated, and not sit unread, gathering dust on a forgotten shelf, don’t you agree?

Christopher Paolini

November 17, 1983: Happy 30th birthday, Christopher Paolini! The young science fiction author was home schooled and managed to graduate high school at 15, after which he published his first best seller, Eragon.