Quote

Here’s a great quote to start the week off! 🙃

  

I know all those words, but that sentence makes no sense to me. 


~Matt Groening

Happy birthday, Matt Groening! The Simpsons creator did not find success overnight. After moving to Los Angeles to make it as a writer, he instead found himself washing dishes at a nursing home, bussing tables, and landscaping at a sewage treatment plant. The experience led him to create his self-published comic book, Life in Hell.

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Quote

Have a Wonderful Good Friday and Passover! Here’s the Quote of the day!

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The greatest danger to our future is apathy. 

Jane Goodall

Happy 81st birthday, Jane Goodall! The renowned primatologist got her doctorate without ever receiving a bachelor’s degree. She was also the first scientist to observe chimpanzees using tools.

All My Best,
Jill M Roberts

Quote

Have a Wonderful Good Friday and Passover! Here’s the Quote of the day!

image

The greatest danger to our future is apathy. 

Jane Goodall

Happy 81st birthday, Jane Goodall! The renowned primatologist got her doctorate without ever receiving a bachelor’s degree. She was also the first scientist to observe chimpanzees using tools.

All My Best,
Jill M Roberts

Quote of the day for Friday the 13th!

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There are nights when the wolves are silent and only the moon howls.

George Carlin

Get ready! Today is both Friday the 13th and a full moon. Superstitious fears about Friday the 13th began in the late 19th century, but belief that the full moon causes chaos has ancient roots.

Word of the day for Thursday!

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onomasticon
on-uh-MAS-ti-kon, -kuhn

–noun

1. a list or collection of proper names.
2. a list or collection of specialized terms, as those used in a particular field or subject area.

Quotes

A quick look at any onomasticon shows how many more Greek names begin with alpha than with any other letter.
— Edited by Benjamin Acosta-Hughes, Elizabeth Kosmetatou and Manuel Baumbach , Labored in Papyrus Leaves: Perspectives on an Epigram Collection Attributed to Posidippus , 2004

We bring this up because today happens to be the 162nd birthday of Mr. Roget’s compendium of synonyms. Yes, on this date in 1852, the first edition of Peter Roget’s onomasticon was published.
— Greg Mandel , “Tuesday’s Edge: Have you seen today’s Butt?” The Oregonian , 2014

Origin

Onomasticon entered English in the early 1700s from the Greek onomastikòn meaning “vocabulary arranged by subjects.”

Quote of the day for Thursday!

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Perhaps the rare and simple pleasure of being seen for what one is compensates for the misery of being it.

Margaret Drabble

Happy 75th birthday, Margaret Drabble! The British novelist is involved in well-known literary feud with her sister, the writer A.S. Byatt. It seems that Byatt took offense when Drabble wrote about a family tea set—as a result, the two do not read each other’s books.

Word of the day!

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boondoggle
BOON-dog-uhl, -daw-guhl

verb

to do work of little or no practical value merely to keep or look busy.
to deceive or attempt to deceive: to boondoggle investors into a low-interest scheme.

noun

a product of simple manual skill, as a plaited leather cord for the neck or a knife sheath, made typically by a camper or a scout.
work of little or no value done merely to keep or look busy.
a project funded by the federal government out of political favoritism that is of no real value to the community or the nation.

Quotes

To the cowboy it meant the making of saddle trappings out of odds and ends of leather, and they boondoggled when there was nothing else to do on the ranch.
— , The Chicago Tribune , 1935

Against this backdrop, what happens next in California has broad import. Will the Monterey Shale be a boon, a boondoggle or, worse, an environmental mess?
— Alex Prud’homme , “‘Fracking’ the Monterey Shale — boon or boondoggle?” Los Angeles Times , 2013

Origin

Boondoggle is an Americanism that dates to the 1930s. The term’s origin is obscure, but it was popularized during the New Deal as a pejorative word for government projects for the unemployed.