Word of the day~ January 3rd – SoundCloud

Listen to Word of the day~ January 3rd by JillNYC76 #np on #SoundCloud  Here
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peremptory • \puh-REMP-tuh-ree\  • adjective
1 : barring a right of action, debate, or delay 2 : expressive of urgency or command 3 : marked by arrogant self-assurance : haughty 

Examples:
The manager’s peremptory rejection of any suggestions for improving office efficiency did little to inspire our confidence in his ability to help turn the company around. 

“Depending on the situation, Elliott can heap upon her teammates words of encouragement or, when it’s needed, she can also be peremptory.” — Chris Hummer,Midland (Texas) Reporter-Telegram, November 10, 2014

Did you know?
Peremptory is ultimately from Latin perimere, which means “to take entirely” or “destroy” and comes from per-(“thoroughly”) and emere (“to take”). Peremptory implies the removal of one’s option to disagree or contest something. It sometimes suggests an abrupt dictatorial manner combined with an unwillingness to tolerate disobedience or dissent (as in “he was given a peremptory dismissal”). A related term is the adjective preemptive, which comes from Latin praeemere—from prae- (“before”) plus emerePreemptive means “marked by the seizing of the initiative” (as in “a preemptive attack”).

All My Best,
Jill M Roberts

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Word of the day~zaibatsu – SoundCloud

Listen to Word of the day~zaibatsu by JillNYC76 #np on #SoundCloud
Click here to hear your word of the day: zaibatsu
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zaibatsu • \zye-BAHT-soo\  • noun
: a powerful financial and industrial conglomerate of Japan 

Examples:
As owners of a zaibatsu with interests in the insurance and banking industries, the family’s decisions had an undeniable impact on the Japanese economy. 

“Cartels have also been fostered by the nation-state: Japan’s zaibatsu conglomerates fueled its empire, and the United States was a hotbed of collusion well into the early 1900s.” — Paul Voosen, The Chronicle of Higher Education, September 16, 2013

Did you know?
Zaibatsu is a compound formed by the Japanese words zai, meaning “money” or “wealth,” and batsu, meaning “clique” or “clan.” The word refers to one of several large capitalist enterprises that developed in Japan after the Meiji Restoration of 1868 and that expanded rapidly during World War I. Each zaibatsu was typically organized around a single family and controlled interests in multiple areas, such as mining, foreign trade, textiles, insurance, and especially banks. While zaibatsus were dissolved during the Allied occupation of Japan following World War II (around the time the word entered English), many of the individual companies that comprised them continued to be managed as they had been, and the term has survived.

All My Best,
Jill M Roberts

Word of the day – SoundCloud

Listen to Word of the day by JillNYC76 #np on #SoundCloud
réchauffé

Even though it’s yesterday’s word, I thought it was a good one! Just click on réchauffé above and the word of the day will play for you! Or, you can read it below:
réchauffé • \ray-shoh-FAY\  • noun
1 : something presented in a new form without change of substance : rehash 2 : a warmed-over dish of food 

Examples:
The day after the holiday, it was traditional to serveréchauffés and snacks rather than cook a full meal. 

“[It] is a réchauffé, … lifted and stitched from ‘The Gastronomical Me’ and other books.” — Victoria Glendinning, New York Times Book Review, June 9, 1991

Did you know?
We borrowed réchauffé in the early 19th century from the French; it is the past participle of their verb réchauffer, which means “to reheat.” Nineteenth-century French speakers were using it figuratively to designate something that was already old hat—you might say, “warmed over.” English speakers adopted that same meaning, which is still our most common. But within decades someone had apparently decided that leftovers would seem more appealing with a French name. The notion caught on. A recipe for “Réchauffé of Beef a la Jardiniere,” for example, instructs the cook to reheat “yesterday’s piece of meat” in a little water with some tomatoes added, and serve it on a platter with peas and carrots and potatoes. Réchauffé shares its root with another English word, chafing dish, the name of a receptacle for keeping food warm at the table.

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Thanks and Make it a great day! 🙂