Happy Thursday! Here’s your quote of the day…

  

There are some works so luminous…so powerful that they give us strength, and force us to new undertakings. A book can play this role. 


Hervé Le Tellier

Happy birthday, Hervé Le Tellier! The French writer and linguist became a notable name in his home country after the publication of Les amnésiques n’ont rien vécu d’inoubliable, a collection of 1,000 short sentences that all began with “Je sense que…” (“I think that…”).

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Quote of the day!

  I believed that books might save him because I knew they had so far, and because I knew the people books had saved. 


Rebecca Makkai

Happy birthday, Rebecca Makkai! The Borrower, her first book, took readers on a crazy road trip with a children’s librarian and a ten-year-old bookworm. It was a Booklist Top Ten Debut.

Friday’s Finally Here!!! Today’s Quote is a Good One…

  

Flawed, imperfect creatures! That’s what we both are, oga! That’s what we ALL are! 

Nnedi Okorafor

Happy birthday, Nnedi Okorafor! In high school, she was a star tennis player, but surgery to correct her scoliosis derailed her hopes of becoming a pro athlete. During her lengthy recovery, she picked up writing as a replacement hobby. Today she’s an award-winning author of several adult and children’s books.

Word of the Day!

Word of the Day : April 5, 2016

declension
noun dih-KLEN-shun

Definition

1 : the inflectional forms of a noun, pronoun, or adjective

2 : a falling off or away : deterioration

3 : descent, slope

Examples

The most common declension in modern English is the set of plural nouns marked as plural with a simple “-s.”

“You jump in and begin seeing and hearing simple words in the foreign language and start translating, learning nouns, verbs, and other parts of speech without memorizing declensions and without tears.” — Reid Kanaley, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 2 May 2016

Did You Know?

Declension came into English (via Middle French) in the first half of the 15th century, originating in the Latin verb declinare, meaning “to inflect” or “to turn aside.” The word seems to have whiled away its time in the narrow field of grammar until Shakespeare put a new sense of the word in his play Richard III in 1593: “A beauty-waning and distressed widow / … Seduc’d the pitch and height of his degree / To base declension and loath’d bigamy.” This “deterioration” sense led within a few decades to the newest sense of the word still in common use, “descent” or “slope.” The 19th century saw still another new sense of the word—meaning “a courteous refusal”—but that sense has remained quite rare. 

Listen to the Word of the day!

Make it a Great Day!

XX Jill

Quote

Thank Goodness it’s Friday! Here’s the Quote of the day…

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What are men to rocks and mountains?

Jane Austen

 

April 1, 1816: The Prince Regent enjoyed Jane Austen’s novels, but he requested that she try her hand at a historical romance with less satirical and humorous elements. Austen was not amused. On this day, she wrote to the Prince Regent, “I could not sit down to write a serious romance under any other motive than to save my life.”