Word of the day for 27th of January 

  

adjective

 1. inclined to quarrel or fight readily; quarrelsome; belligerent; combative. 

Quotes

Pugnacious people, if they did not actually terrify Oscar, were at least the sort of people he could not control, and whom he feared as possibly able to coerce him.
– George Bernard Shaw, “My Memories of Oscar Wilde,” Oscar Wilde: His Life and Confessions by Frank Harris, 1916

In addition, Rose, in retirement, had often resorted to the headfirst, pugnacious style he displayed as a player, not always seeming contrite about what he had done wrong.
– Michael S. Schmidt, “Dear Pete Rose: It’s Still a No. Sincerely, Baseball,” New York Times, December 14, 2015

Origin

Pugnacious stems from the Latin pugnāre meaning “to fight,” and shares ancestry with English word pugilism meaning “the art or practice of fighting with the fists; boxing.” Pugnacious entered English in the mid-1600s. 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s