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Hope you’re having a wonderful Sunday! Here’s the quote of the day…

  

A book too, can be a star, a living fire to lighten the darkness, leading out into the expanding universe. 
-Madeleine L’Engle

On her 40th birthday, Madeleine L’Engle (born November 29, 1918) tried to give up writing. She was drowning in rejection letters and unable to help support her family. The writing break didn’t last long, though—L’Engle couldn’t stop jotting down her ideas. Five years later, she finally found success with her beloved science fiction classic, A Wrinkle in Time.

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Happy Saturday! Here’s your quote of the day…

  

Nothing whets the intelligence more than a passionate suspicion, nothing develops all the faculties of an immature mind more than a trail running away into the dark. 
-Stefan Zweig

Jewish Austrian novelist Stefan Zweig (born November 28, 1881) had his celebrated literary career cut short by Hitler’s rise to power. To escape persecution, he fled his home country—briefly living in England and America before settling in Petrópolis, a German-colonized mountain town in Brazil.

Happy Black Friday! Here’s Your Quote of the Day…

  

People can lose their lives in libraries. They ought to be warned. 
~Saul Bellow

November 27, 1947: On this day, Saul Bellow got a job offer. His father, perhaps unimpressed with his son’s career as a novelist, offered to make him a mine supervisor at $10,000 a year.

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Thank goodness it’s Friday! Here’s your quote of the day…

  

I’m a candle flame that sways in currents of air you can’t see. You need to be the one who steadies me to burn. 
~Nadine Gordimer

South African writer Nadine Gordimer (born November 20, 1923) was heavily involved in the anti-apartheid movement. She helped Nelson Mandela edit his famous speech “I Am Prepared to Die”—and when Mandela was finally released from prison, she was one of the first people he asked to see.

Happy Saturday! Here is your quote of the day…

    A childhood without books – that would be no childhood. That would be like being shut out from the enchanted place where you can go and find the rarest kind of joy. 

Astrid Lindgren

Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (born November 14, 1907) created her most famous character, Pippi Longstocking, to amuse her young daughter. Today Lindgren is the third most translated children’s book author after Hans Christian Andersen and the Grimm brothers.