Word of the day for Tuesday!

redux • \ree-DUKS\  • adjective
: brought back 

Examples:
Now running in his own campaign, the son of the former mayor was advised to develop his own identity and not simply portray himself as his father redux

“Think of it as ‘Combat Evolved’ redux. ‘Destiny’ wants to meld the multiplayer and single-player experience into a coherent whole.” — Gieson Cacho, San Jose Mercury News, September 16, 2014

Did you know?
In Latin, redux (from the verb reducere, meaning “to lead back”) can mean “brought back” or “bringing back.” The Romans used redux as an epithet for the Goddess Fortuna with its “bringing back” meaning; Fortuna Redux was “one who brings another safely home.” But it was the “brought back” meaning that made its way into English. Redux belongs to a small class of English adjectives that are always used postpositively—that is, they always follow the words they modify. Redux has a history of showing up in titles of English works, such as John Dryden’s Astraea Redux (a poem “on the happy restoration and return of his sacred majesty, Charles the Second”), Anthony Trollope’s Phineas Redux, and John Updike’s Rabbit Redux.

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