Thesaurus for the WOD

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Thesaurus for Apropos
apropos
adjective
relevant, suitable
Synonyms: applicable, apposite, appropriate, apt, befitting, belonging, correct, fit, fitting, germane, kosher*, legit, material, on the button, on the nose, opportune, pertinent, proper, related, right, right on, seemly
Antonyms: inappropriate, irrelevant, unsuitable

apropos
adverb
relevantly, suitably
Synonyms: appropriately, aptly, opportunely, pertinently, suitably, timely
Antonyms: inappropriately, irrelevantly, unsuitably

apropos
preposition
in respect of
Synonyms: about, against, as for, as regards, as to, concerning, on the subject of, regarding, respecting, touching, toward, with reference to, with respect to

WOD

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apropos
[ ap-r uh – poh ]
adverb
fitting; at the right time; to the purpose; opportunely.
Obsolete . by the way.
adjective
opportune; pertinent: apropos remarks.
Idioms
apropos of with reference to; in respect or regard to: apropos of the preceding statement.
Example Sentences:
However, theirs is an evolving society with nuance and intricacy that makes simple truths no longer apropos .
That’s so cute and very apropos .
Often, apropos of nothing, his villains will break into a momentary soft shoe.
Origin: 1660–70; < French à propos literally, to purpose < Latin ad prōpositum. See ad-, proposition

Thesaurus for the WOD

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Thesaurus for Proverbial
proverbial
adjective
conventional, traditional
Synonyms: accepted, acknowledged, archetypal, axiomatic, current, customary, famed, familiar, famous, general, legendary, notorious, self-evident, time-honored, typical, unquestioned, well-known
Antonyms: abnormal, atypical, different, unconventional, unknown, untraditional

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proverbial
[ pr uh – vur -bee- uh l ]
adjective
of, pertaining to, or characteristic of a proverb: proverbial brevity.
expressed in a proverb or proverbs: proverbial wisdom.
of the nature of or resembling a proverb: proverbial sayings.
having been made the subject of a proverb: the proverbial barn door which is closed too late.
having become an object of common mention or reference: your proverbial inability to get anywhere on time.
Example Sentences:
That’s our new conventional wisdom about an age of proverbial prudery.
Digital books are flying off the proverbial shelves.
They are the proverbial bad penny and the persistent bad cold.
Origin: 1400–50; late Middle English < Latin prōverbiālis. See proverb, -al1
Related Forms—-
pro·ver·bi·al·ly , adverb
un·pro·ver·bi·al , adjective
un·pro·ver·bi·al·ly , adverb

Lexical Investigations~ Awkward

Lexical Investigations: Awkward
A motley combination of Anglo-Saxon, Latin, and Germanic dialects, the English language (more or less as we know it) coalesced between the 9th and 13th centuries. Since then, it has continued to import and borrow words and expressions from around the world, and the meanings have mutated. (Awesome and awful once meant nearly the same thing.) Some specimens in the English vocabulary have followed unusually circuitous routes to their place in the contemporary lexicon, and this series, Lexical Investigations, unpacks those words hiding in our midst.

Awkward
“Awk” is an obsolete word meaning “turned the wrong way,” and originally awkward just meant “in an awk direction,” just as forward means to move to the front and backward means to move to the rear. An awk direction could be back-handed, upside-down, or in reverse of the expected order (though if you compliment a professional tennis player on a great awkward stroke instead of a strong backhand, don’t expect them to feel flattered). In the sixteenth century, fradulent behavior that was not straightforward was said to be awkward—that’s a far cry from today, when sometimes the most awkward thing a person can do is be too honest.
These days, you might hear groups of teenagers acknowledging awkward silences. Over the last decade, high school and college students have occasionally used a playful hand gesture called “awkward turtle” to express a remarkably uncomfortable moment, though this has largely fallen out of use at this point.
Popular References:
Awkward, a comedy series on MTV that premiered in 2011 about the life of teenagers.
The Awkward Comedy Show, a documentary of stand-up performances by four comedians. According to the show’s website, “It’s a film to showcase a category of black comedian rarely witnessed: the nerd variety.”
Related Quotations:
“Young recruits are awkward in their marching, and clumsy in their manual labour.”
—George Crabb, English synonymes explained, in alphabetical order (1816)
“The awk end here is, of course, the wrong end, that which was not towards them.”
— Oxford Journals, Notes and queries (1853)
“I don’t believe she ever had an awkward age; she was probably graceful at sixteen.”
—Constance Fenimore Wilson, East Angels (1886)
“In comedy, awkward is king.”
—Robert Lloyd, LA Times, March 29, 2009.

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Since it’s Sunday, I picked a word that should be appropriate…

daven
[ DAH-vuhn ]
Definition: to pray.
– verb
to pray.
Examples:
There, day or night, everyone — the men, the women, even the children — could daven nonstop.
– Erica Lann-Clark, “The Goats Know the Way,” The Healing Heart , 2003
Every morning he wakes early to daven outside, facing Jerusalem. When I watch him from the window, I regret having taught him to sound out the Hebrew letters when he was only five.
– Nicole Krauss, The History of Love

Lexical Investigations ~Desiderata

Lexical Investigations: Desiderata
Desiderata
Desiderata is a plural noun, with the singular form desideratum, meaning “things wanted or needed”: “Happily-ever-after” and “eternal love” appear to be the desiderata of the current generation to whom “fat chance” say those of us who are older, wiser and more curmudgeonly.
For many, the word desiderata most often evokes the famous poem by Max Ehrmann, written in 1927 and often referred to simply as Desiderata, without attribution or quotation marks. The poem begins with oft-quoted the lines, “Go placidly amid the noise and the haste, / and remember what peace there may be in silence.”
Though the poem has achieved a mythic quality and a near-spiritual significance for some, it was not well known until the 1970s when it was made into hugely popular posters and sound recordings. Even Leonard Nimoy of Star Trek fame included a spoken-word rendition of Desiderata on his album Leonard Nimoy Presents Mr. Spock’s Music from Outer Space in the track “Spock Thoughts.”
Listen to the track:
The word can be traced back to the 19th century, when it became fashionable for English-speakers to use little-known Latin words in place of shorter, more common Anglo-Saxon terms. Latin words were thought to be more elegant and more precise than their English counterparts, and the users of these words no doubt hoped to be seen as more intellectual and sophisticated. Desiderata gained popularity in the early 1800s as part of this trend, which had its many critics. In 1864, Henry Alford wrote that English “is undergoing a sad and rapid process of deterioration. Its fine manly Saxon is getting diluted into long Latin words not carrying half the meaning.” Many, like Alford, considered Latinate words pretentious, and advocated for what they considered a purer form of English.
Spanish and French also absorbed desiderata from Latin, and the word continues to have the same meaning in both languages today.
Some writers misuse desiderata as a singular noun. The correct singular form is desideratum.
Popular References:
Desiderata, Madder Mortem, CD (2006).
“Desiderata,” The Poems of Max Ehrmann, Max Ehrmann (1927). The text was largely unknown in the author’s lifetime. After its use in a devotional, it was turned into a hugely popular poster.
The Queen’s English: stray notes on speaking and spelling, by Henry Alford. A. Strahan, 1864
English in nineteenth-century England: an introduction, by Manfred Görlach, 1999
Relevant Quotations.
“When you arrive at Savannah, I have many desiderata, as usual.”
—Henry Muhlenberg, Reliquiae Baldwinianae: selections from the correspondence of the late William Baldwin (1843)
“When posters of the poem ‘Desiderata’ adorned dormitory walls in the 70s, an entire column was devoted to clearing up its clouded origins.”
—Reference and Adult Services Division of the American Library Association, RQ, Vol 25 (1986)

A motley combination of Anglo-Saxon, Latin, and Germanic dialects, the English language (more or less as we know it) coalesced between the 9th and 13th centuries. Since then, it has continued to import and borrow words and expressions from around the world, and the meanings have mutated. (Awesome and awful once meant nearly the same thing.) Some specimens in the English vocabulary have followed unusually circuitous routes to their place in the contemporary lexicon, and this series, Lexical Investigations, unpacks those words hiding in our midst.

WOD

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preterition
[ pret-uh-RISH-uhn ]
Definition: the act of passing by or over; omission; disregard.
– noun
the act of passing by or over; omission; disregard.
Law. the passing over by a testator of an heir otherwise entitled to a portion.
Calvinistic Theology. the passing over by God of those not elected to salvation or eternal life.
Rhetoric. paralipsis.
Examples:
He had no innate sense of tragedy or preterition or complex binds or any of the things that made human beings’ misfortunes significant to one another.
– David Foster Wallace, Oblivion , 2004
I am a liar (by preterition ), not an actor.