A Little Trivia for Today

Previously holding the position as Princeton University president, which president was nicknamed “Professor”?

Before entering politics, Woodrow Wilson spent many years as a college professor. He would become president of Princeton University and Governor of New Jersey before becoming elected the 28th President of the United States. Wilson led America through World War I and crafted the Versailles Treaty’s “Fourteen Points,” the last of which was creating a League of Nations, a precursor to the United Nations. An advocate for democracy and world peace, “The Professor” is often ranked by historians as one of the nation’s greatest presidents.

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Did you know…? This Day in History

Did You Know…Canned beer makes its debut on this day in 1935. In partnership with the American Can Company, the Gottfried Krueger Brewing Company delivered 2,000 cans of Krueger’s Finest Beer and Krueger’s Cream Ale to faithful Krueger drinkers in Richmond, Virginia. Canned beer was an immediate success. Ninety-one percent of the drinkers approved of the canned beer, driving Krueger to give the green light to further production. By the end of the year, 37 breweries follow the lead of the Gottfried Krueger Brewery.

Did you know…? Series of Highlights in Internet History

Highlights in Internet History

Did you know…Co-founded in 1994 by Jerry Yang and David Filo while they were PhD students at Stanford, the company that would become a leading search engine and pioneer of the internet used to go by a much lesser known name. The search engine giant began as Jerry’s Guide to the World Wide Web, but by 1995 the founders realized they’d need something a bit more concise, so they renamed the company Yahoo! — an acronym for “Yet Another Hierarchical Officious Oracle.” According to Filo, the exclamation point was added for “pure marketing hype.”

Today’s Trivia

Question: Which President is mentioned by name in the theme song of TV’s “All in the Family”?

Answer: On this day in 1971, the sitcom “All in the Family” premiered on CBS. The opening theme song “Those Were the Days”, was presented in a unique way for a 1970s series: Carroll O’Connor and Jean Stapleton seated at a piano and singing the tune on-camera at the start of every episode, concluding with live-audience applause. Herbert Hoover’s name is mentioned in the famous theme song to “All in the Family” with the lyrics…”Mister, we could use a man like Herbert Hoover again.” The show ranked number-one in the yearly Nielsen ratings from 1971 to 1976.

Today’s Trivia: Which founding father was killed as a result of wounds sustained in a duel?

Which founding father was killed as a result of wounds sustained in a duel?

Answer: Alexander Hamilton was shot and mortally wounded by Vice President Aaron Burr in one of the most famous duels in American history. The duel was the culmination of a long and bitter rivalry between the two men. Tensions reached a boiling point with Hamilton’s journalistic defamation of Burr’s character during the 1804 New York gubernatorial race. Ultimately, Burr challenged Hamilton to a duel. When both men drew their guns and shot, Hamilton was fatally wounded and brought back to New York City, where he died the next day.

Quote of the Day!

“Language is the only thing worth knowing even poorly.”

― Kató Lomb (Hungarian polyglot)

Today’s quote comes from Marco at AuthrnticGermanLearning.com 😊👌🏻

If you’re looking to learn German, he is an excellent teacher and source of information! You can also check out his YouTube channel Authentic German Learning!

Today in History, November 19th

11/19/2017

4 Score and 4 Trivia Questions about the Gettysburg Address

President Abraham Lincoln gave the Gettysburg Address on November 19th, 1863. It’s widely regarded as one of the famous speeches in history, but how much do you know about it? Try your hand at these four trivia questions about 272 words that proved a speech doesn’t have to be long to be memorable…

Who Wrote the Speech for Lincoln?

Rather than vilify the Confederacy after the battle of Gettysburg, Lincoln chose a more inclusionary tone for his speech. Photo credit: Greg Goebel/Flickr.

Today, whenever a president gives a speech, you know that it has been written by a professional speechwriter – someone who actually studied the art of public speaking and knows the mechanics of delivering a great speech. But in 1863, things were done a little differently. It was, in fact, Abraham Lincoln himself who wrote the Gettysburg Address – every word of it. He finished the speech the night before he gave it and spoke from the heart. That’s why it is still so powerful today.

Why Is This Speech So Famous?

Lincoln came out the night before his speech and told a few jokes to a crowd of several hundred people.

Lincoln could have made the speech all about defeating the South and winning the war, but he did not. Instead, he geared the speech toward keeping the country together, working together, healing rifts, and honoring the democratic intent of the country’s Founding Fathers. This was not a bitter speech, nor did it try to stir up anger or fear. It would have been very easy for Lincoln to go the emotional button-pressing route, but he took a more inclusionary path, reminding people that the war was not being fought to vanquish an enemy, but to hold together a country that was started with such promise.

What Was the Original Purpose of the Speech?

Lincoln’s speech was really supposed to be a short address that was more of an afterthought than anything else. The ceremony’s star guest was famed speaker Edward Everett, who spoke for two hours. Lincoln did plan out what he would say (the legend that he wrote it on the fly was just that, a legend), but his invitation was a last-minute decision, and he was supposed to be there more for moral support than anything else. Lincoln’s intent in the speech was to remind people of how important this war was to the country and to try to keep morale up after such a devastating battle. Instead, the short speech gradually gained a reputation for being one of the most eloquent examples of patriotism and devotion to the ideals of democracy.

What Newspaper Retracted the Poor Review it originally gave the Gettysburg Address 150 Years Later?

NPR did a tongue-in-cheek story about the paper’s retraction, including an interview with the Opinion Page editor.

At the time, newspapers made no bones about which side they supported. The Patriot-Union, a Pennsylvania newspaper, dismissed the president’s remarks as “silly” and wrote, “For the credit of the nation, we are willing that the veil of oblivion shall be dropped over them and that there shall be no more repeated or thought of.” At the 150 year anniversary of the Gettysburg Address, in 2013, the same newspaper, now known as the Patriot-News of Harrisburg, issued a retraction which read, “Seven score and ten years ago, the forefathers of this media institution brought forth to his audience a judgment so flawed, so tainted by hubris, so lacking in the perspective history would bring that it cannot remain unaddressed in our archives.”

Today in History ~October 9th

Today in History – October 9

October 9

On October 9, 1701, the colonial legislature of Connecticut chartered the Collegiate School in Saybrook to educate students for “Publick employment both in Church & Civil State.” Originally based at the house of the first rector in Killingworth, the school moved to New Haven in 1716, and in 1718 was renamed Yale College to honor its early benefactor, the merchant Elihu Yale.
Osborn Hall, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. [between 1900 and 1915]. Detroit Publishing Company. Prints & Photographs Division

Yale graduates were influential in the American Revolution. Lyman Hall, Philip Livingston, Lewis Morris, and Oliver Wolcott signed the Declaration of Independence. Twenty-five Yale men served in the Continental Congress and the patriots Nathan Hale and Noah Webster also were among its graduates.

Yale evolved into a university in the late 1700s to mid-1800s when its original liberal arts curriculum expanded to include graduate and professional education. Among Yale’s most prestigious schools are those of divinity, medicine, law, and art. The first doctoral degrees earned in the United States were awarded by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in 1861.
In 1832, the Yale University Art Gallery became the first American college art museum. Built with funds from the Connecticut legislature, the gallery housed a series of American Revolutionary War paintings donated by Colonel John Trumbull. Also associated with Yale are the Yale Center for British Art , the Peabody Museum of Natural History, and Yale University Press , one of the nation’s most distinguished university publishing houses.

Yale has had other notable nineteenth-century firsts. These include the first collegiate rowing races, held in 1843, and the first intercollegiate game of modern baseball in 1865. In 1861 Yale became the first U.S. university to award a PhD in philosophy. The Yale Daily News, the oldest college daily newspaper, was founded in 1878.

Notable Yale graduates include: presidents William Howard Taft, Gerald Ford, George H. W. Bush, and Bill Clinton; inventor Samuel F. B. Morse; Dr. Benjamin Spock, and statesman John C. Calhoun. In 1781, Yale University conferred the honorary degree of “Doctorate in Laws” on George Washington. Search on Yale in the collection George Washington Papers to view the correspondence of Ezra Stiles, president of the university, with George Washington.

Article of the Day for September 25th

St Botolph’s Church, Quarrington

St Botolph’s Church is an Anglican place of worship in the village of Quarrington, part of the civil parish of Sleaford in Lincolnshire, England. By the time Domesday Book was compiled in 1086, a church in Quarrington was part of Ramsey Abbey’s fee, and around 1165 it was granted to Haverholme Priory. The right to present the rector was claimed by the Abbey in the 13th century, by the Bishop of Lincoln in the early 16th century, and by Robert Carre and his descendants after Carre acquired a manor at Quarrington. The oldest parts of the current building date to the 13th century, although substantial rebuilding took place over the following century. Renovations followed and the local architect Charles Kirk the Younger carried out restoration work in 1862 and 1863, when he added a chancel in his parents’ memory. The church consists of a tower and spire with a nave and north aisle spanning eastwards to the chancel. With capacity for 124 people, the church serves the ecclesiastic parish of Quarrington with Old Sleaford. Recognised for its age and tracery, the church has been designated a grade II* listed building. 

Courtesy of Wikipedia 

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