Word of the day for Saturday, October 18th

neophilia • \nee-uh-FILL-ee-uh\  • noun
: love or enthusiasm for what is new or novel 

Examples:
Loretta wondered if it was neophilia that led her husband to buy shiny new power tools even when the ones he already had were in perfect condition. 

“Time was, not too many years ago, when shopping was a pleasure. The atmosphere at the malls, the array of items, the decor, the people, the variety of shops, all beckoned to our neophilia, although I wasn’t aware there was a word for it.” — Juanita Hughes, Cherokee Tribune(Canton, Georgia), September 2, 2014

Did you know?
The earliest known example of neophilia in print is from an 1899 issue of Political Science Quarterly, a publication of Columbia University. The word is a combination of the Greek-derived combining forms neo-, meaning “new,” and-philia, meaning “liking for.” In the 1930s, the formneophily was introduced as a synonym of neophilia, but no neophilia could save it from obscurity—it has never caught on. The opposite of neophilia is neophobia, meaning “a dread of or aversion to novelty.” It has been around slightly longer than neophilia, having first appeared in 1886.

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The weekend is finally here! Enjoy it and here is your quote of the day…

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Folks want to glow, to leave their worries and dead skin behind. 

Terry McMillan

Happy 63rd birthday, Terry McMillan! Her bestselling third novel, Waiting to Exhale, about four successful black women looking for love, was also made into a popular film.

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Thank goodness it’s Thursday! Here’s your quote of the day…

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A party without cake is just a meeting 

Julia Child

October 16, 1961: Culinary life was forever changed with the publication of Julia Child, Simone Beck, and Louisette Bertholle’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking, 53 years ago today.

Hope everyone has a good one! Here’s your word of the day…

doctrinaire • \dahk-truh-NAIR\  • adjective
: attempting to put into effect an abstract doctrine or theory with little or no regard for practical difficulties 

Examples:
“As doctrinaire as I may be about players being ready to play every day,” Coach said, “they are also human beings; I need to accept they are going to need breaks once in a while.” 

“We use endorsement interviews to see how candidates interact with their opponents, how politically daring (ordoctrinaire) they are and whether they’re thinking more about the public’s good or their own campaigns.” — Elizabeth Sullivan, Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), September 21, 2014

Did you know?
Doctrinaire didn’t start out as a critical word. In post-revolutionary France, a group who favored constitutional monarchy called themselves Doctrinaires. Doctrine in French, as in English, is a word for the principles on which a government is based; it is ultimately from Latindoctrina, meaning “teaching” or “instruction.” But both ultraroyalists and revolutionists strongly derided any doctrine of reconciling royalty and representation as utterly impracticable, and they resented the Doctrinaires’ influence over Louis XVIII. So when doctrinaire became an adjective, “there adhered to it some indescribable tincture of unpopularity which was totally indelible” (Blanc’s History of Ten Years 1830-40, translated by Walter K. Kelly in 1848).

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The week’s half done! Have a wonderful day and here’s your quote…

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A classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say. 

Italo Calvino

Journalist and author Italo Calvino (born October 15, 1923) grew up surrounded by his father’s botanical experiments. That early setting would later manifest in books like The Baron in the Tree